Temples of Malta
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Temples of Malta

Malta is an island south of Italy in the Mediterranean Sea. Over 5000 years ago the inhabitants built Temple Megaliths which are now the oldest free standing structures in the world.

The Megalithic Temples of Malta are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site comprising seven temples on the islands of Malta and Gozo. The two temples of Ggantija on the island of Gozo are notable for their gigantic Bronze Age structures. On the island of Malta, the temples of Hagar Qin, Mnajdra and Tarxien are unique architectural masterpieces, given the limited resources available to their builders. The Ta' Hagrat and Skorba complexes show how the tradition of temple building was handed down in Malta.

Tarxien Temple
The Tarxien temples were built in the period 3600 - 2500 BC. The temple complex consists of four temples with separate entrances connected by a square court. The complex design of the Tarxien Temples and the elaborate carved symbols are from the final phase of Maltese temple architecture. The temples were probably used for animal sacrifice, animal bones and flint blades were discovered in a carved altar.   More...


Ggantija
Ggantija Temples in Xaghra, Gozo, are one of the most important archaeological sites in Malta. The origins of Ggantija date back to the Ggantija phase (3600 – 3200 B.C.). John Otto Bayer was the first to excavate the temples in 1827. Extensive archaeological and restoration work was carried out in the early 20th century to ensure their preservation. The Ggantija megalithic complex consists of two temples surrounded by a massive common boundary wall. One of the most striking features of the entire complex, the boundary wall, is built using the alternating header and stretcher technique, with some of the megaliths exceeding five metres in length and weighing over fifty tons.   More...


Hagar Qim
Hagar Qim Megalithic Temple was built over 5200 years ago in the Ggantija phase of Temple building (3600 - 3200 BC). The Temple is on a hilltop overlooking the sea about 2km south-west of the village of Qrendi on the island of Malta. The Mnajdra Temple is just 500 meter towards the cliff face.    More...


Mnajdra
Mnajdra lies tucked in a hollow in the cliffs on Malta’s southern coast. The site is probably the most atmospheric of all Malta’s temples. It lies in an isolated position on a rugged stretch of coast overlooking the isle of Fifla and just 500m from another principle temple site, Hagar Qim. The surrounding area is designated a Heritage Park and is typical of rugged Mediterranean garigue landscape. Barren in summer, the landscape is transformed in spring by flowering herbs and shrubs. Mnajdra is a complex site consisting of three temples overlooking an oval forecourt. The first and oldest temple is a simple three-apsed building and dates to the Ggantija phase (3600-3200 BC). The small rubble walls are a modern reconstruction but the small uprights, with their pitted decoration, are original.   More...


Ta Hagrat
Ta’ Hagrat, lying in a picturesque and evocative setting on the outskirts of Mgarr, is an important temple site. Dating from around 3600 – 3200 BC, it is one of the earliest temple buildings in Malta. Ta’ Hagrat is smaller than many of the Islands’ temples, at 15m long internally, but it is better preserved. The temple, with its characteristic, imposing façade, is almost undoubtedly a partner to Skorba temples lying just a kilometre away. Ta’ Hagrat comprises a double temple consisting of two adjacent buildings both of which are less formally planned than is usual in temple construction. The smaller temple abuts the major one on the north side.   More...


Maltese Goddess inspired Art

Magna Matter - Maltese GoddessRaphael Labro was born in the South of France, he was exposed at an early age to modern painters such as Picasso, Matisse and Chagall. He was admitted at the Fine Art School of Nice and had his first solo exhibition "Photographisme" in 1973 with artworks created on photographic paper.

He decided to concentrate exclusively in art and after a few years of projects on the Internet he returned to the traditional medium of painting. In his collection of paintings, Labro created his goddesses as strange creatures often depicted in a bulbous form with orange-brown hues and fluorescent green faces. The artist uses colours as symbols. The green colour on the face of the figures represents hope. The golden line behind the figures represents the sacred geometry. More...

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